November 2016 Favourites

It’s December 1st and the falling snow has once again appeared on the blog!

◌ According to this quiz, my three dominant traits are independence, shyness, and orderliness. Replace shyness with introversion and I think it’s bang on.

◌ It’s here: NYT‘s 100 Notable Books of 2016.

◌ List of 25 casseroles. Perfect for this time of the year.

◌ Thanks to my friend D. for alerting me to the Axe Files podcast. If you’re into American politics and in-depth interviews with political figures, this is for you.

◌ Part of Ottolenghi’s Cook for Syria column, this recipe for bulgur with tomato, fried aubergine and cucumber yogurt was spot on. This is one of those ones with quite mundane and banal ingredients that just shines.

This casserole is excellent.

21 of the 21st century’s best docs, according to GQ. Proud to say that one of my aunts has a credit on one of them! (#13)

How the Rolling Stones became fashion icons.

◌ Found my dream job: bibliotherapist.

◌ Ireland’s lighthouse trail looks delightful.

ducks-waterlow

Curried Carrot and Coconut Soup

It’s hard to believe that only 2 weeks remain of the academic semester for me. The fall term always goes by so quickly. This has been a bit of a strange term for me as I navigate the post-PhD job market (a nightmare), tie up loose ends of my PhD, and plan my next research projects, all the while trying to make a living in London — difficult at the best of times.

As a lecturer one’s schedule changes each semester, which I personally don’t mind as it means variety and flexibility. However, this term’s schedule has been particularly challenging when it comes to meal planning and cooking, since the only night that I am actually able to get “into” the kitchen at a decent hour is Friday. Every other night I have to plan things carefully because either (a) I get home late (Tues, Weds, Thurs) and/or H. is teaching in our flat (Mon, Weds, Thurs), which means I can’t cook (open plan is a blessing and a curse!).

This means a lot of meal planning and advance prep. I use a number of strategies to ensure we still eat well and at a decent hour. I try to get a head start on Sundays and either pre-make Monday and/or Tuesday’s meal, or do a lot of advance prep so that they don’t require time to throw together.

This brings me onto soup. For the past couple of years I have made soups most weekends from October-April. They usually last for a weekend lunch plus one lunch or evening meal during the week. Since I usually go to the market on Saturday mornings I always have fresh vegetables on hand. This one from the NYT caught my eye recently. I always have lots of carrots and it seemed like a good combination of creamy and spicy. As with most soups, it’s easy to make. Just don’t make the mistake I did: it calls for a cup (roughly ~230mls) of coconut milk. I got a bit lazy and just dumped a whole can (400mls) in. Don’t do that. It was too creamy. Not creamy enough that I couldn’t eat it, but it wasn’t a good idea. Also, the spice in this is subtle. If you like a spicier version I’d recommend upping the cayenne. Otherwise, this gets the full stamp of approval from me.

carrot-coconut-soup-1

 

“Green Goddess” Mac & Cheese

The term green goddess seems to be everywhere these days. I’m not particularly fond of it, since it seems to be one of those terms that can be appropriated for everything from smoothies to face masks, but I’ve left it in the title because it sounds better than ‘healthier mac and cheese’ or ‘mac and cheese with kale, basil, and spinach.’

I’ll get straight to it: this was a real winner for us. I added in curly kale in addition to the basil and spinach. It’s fairly easy to make — pureeing the greens just takes a bit of extra time. There’s still lots of cheese, but you do feel a bit better eating this knowing that there is some healthy bits! It was absolutely delicious and will become a part of my regular rotation of meals.

img_20161014_200158495

Cornwall

I did not expect to be going back to the southwest of the country so soon after H. & I were in south Devon in early October. However, about a month ago, I got a text from my friend B. asking me if I would like to join her on a trip to Padstow. B. is a journalist working in the luxury travel sector. Our trip would include dinner at Rick Stein’s signature Seafood Restaurant and a day at the Cookery School. After a bit of debate I decided this was too good an opportunity to pass up!

This was my first trip to Cornwall and it was a good introduction, though I understand there are lots of beautiful corners to see of this county. We both highly enjoyed our meals at the Seafood Restaurant and loved the day at the cooking school. My personal favourite was learning how to fillet fish and de-bone a chicken. These are skills that I don’t often need, I’ll be honest, but I really loved learning them. It was also a treat to eat so much delicious fresh seafood.

B. and I have known each other for 15+ years and with very full lives don’t get a chance to catch up as often as we would like even though we live in the same city. That was the best part of the weekend for me!🙂

img_20161021_175508468

img_20161021_210958804

Rick Stein's Cooking School
Rick Stein’s Cooking School
Our self-gutted and -filleted mackerel!
Our self-gutted and -filleted mackerel!

img_20161023_120925213

Umami Apple Pie

Lucy Waverman and Beppi Crosariol’s The Flavour Principle is one of my favourite cookbooks. I love the way it is organized according to taste. This pie appears, as you might be able to guess from the title, in the umami section. Translated from the Japanese as delicious essence, umami is used to describe tastes that are deep, savoury, often ‘meaty’ flavour such as those in Parmesan, prosciutto, and soy sauce.

Onto the pie. It’s been a long time since I have made pie crust, but since this recipe calls for a special ingredient — cheddar cheese — to be added, I had to make it from scratch. And, surprisingly, it turned out well! (Much better than last time!)

I followed the recipe quite closely, using a mix of apples, although found that I had too much of the mixture after cooking them (this was also because I used a slightly smaller pie dish). I did find that the top browned too quickly so covered it with baking paper as Lucy suggests.

I was really pleased with this pie. The cheddar taste is milder than you might think, and delicious. Perfect fall comfort food.

img_20161015_174354666

October 2016 Favourites

October, you always speed by so quickly. Happy Halloween, happy almost November, and almost holiday season(!). This month’s links:

What It Takes to Be a Great Artist.

Love Zadie.

◌ Forget the 2nd cheapest — get the cheapest wine.

Moving a museum of natural history.

◌ I have been on a huge true crime kick: I have now listened to all episodes of the Maura Murray podcast (if you start this, prepare to fall into a rabbit hole); almost finished In Cold Blood; and I could talk about Netflix’s Amanda Knox doc for hours.

◌ Loved this.

◌ (Some of) Canada’s best books of the last 25 years.

Amazing footage of a diving humpback.

How to add more storage to your house. I need just about every single one of these.

Padstow, Cornwall (separate post coming)
Padstow, Cornwall (separate post coming)

Hamburger Helper Casserole

This is the ultimate throwback. When I saw this recipe I knew immediately I had to try it. Yes, I ate Hamburger Helper as a child, and to me it evokes a lot of nostalgia. Also, it’s fall now, and the perfect time for casseroles.

This is a one-potter and very easy to make. I won’t lie in that I was a little bit nervous about the flavour combinations as it contains ingredients I wouldn’t normally put together. I omitted the celery and corn. So…..drum roll…… itt must have been 15+ years since I have had HH, but as soon as I took my first bite, I was transported back to my mum stirring at the stove in our old house! Nag (recipe creator) nailed it! And H., who has never had HH, loved it too. I urge those of you who grew up with this to try it!🙂

 

hamburg-helper

South Devon & Dartmoor National Park

At the end of last month H. & I took off for a few days in Devon to celebrate my new doctor status! As dedicated readers will know, we love the British countryside — the perfect antidote to crazy capital chaos. The highlight for me as ever were the ponies! Thanks to E. & L. for their much-appreciated financial contribution that made this trip possible.🙂

img_20160930_140143509_hdr

img_20160930_153015229_hdr

img-20160930-wa0011

img_8109

img_8120

img_8161

img_8257

Cauliflower Pakoras with Tomato & Ginger Soup

Now that fall is here, sometimes you just crave a simple, healthy, fulfilling meal. That’s how I would describe this one. Both recipes come from Vij’s Indian Cuisine. The book says that they serve the two dishes together in their restaurant, so that is exactly what I decided to do as well.

We had this on a Monday and I made the soup the day before, so just had to warm it up. (This type of prep is something I am trying to do more of — I will get into it more in a future post). The soup is very gingery. It calls for 30g; I didn’t have quite that much so used around 25g. With 15-20 curry leaves, 1tbsp ground coriander, and 1 tsp cayenne as well, it’s pungent, but not offensively so. I liked it.

Onto the pakoras: I decided that pakoras for 6 would be too much, so modified the recipe to make enough for 4. Even so, I ended up with had a huge batch and was able to freeze 2/3 of them. You make them by combining chickpea flour, buttermilk, a potato (which I cut up and parboiled beforehand), cauliflower florets (most of a large cauliflower), hot peppers of your choice, ground coriander, cumin, turmeric, and salt. What I liked about making these is that they were so easy to fry — I didn’t have to worry about them falling apart. As long as the oil is hot enough (a lesson I’ve learned the hard way over the past few years!), they are remarkably stable. You can also play around with the ingredients as well. As long as the flour/buttermilk ratio is ok, I think they are fine (the recipe calls for 3.5 cups gram flour to 2.5 cups buttermilk).

I served them with some plain Greek yogurt mixed with a bit of garlic and salt. These are so good — and freeze really well — that I am going to be making another batch very soon since cauliflower is so plentiful at the moment.

tomato-ginger-soup

Pakoras, anyone?
Pakoras, anyone?

September 2016 Favourites

This, on the invention of Spanx, is brilliant. “I just called them.” Tenacity. (Via Cup of Jo).

Free land in Cape Breton!

◌ I found Michael Ruhlman’s words on adapting for cooking for one (post his marriage breaking down) brave.

36 hours in Edinburgh, one of my favourite cities ever.

◌ 19 recipes for crispy, scraggly fritters. Yum.

◌ Currently reading this (English title: Second-Hand Time). It’s very long — 700+ pages — but engrossing.

◌ Two ‘real crime’ podcasts: Untold is an absolutely brilliantly done story of one of the most horrific inciences of corruption in British history. Essential listening. Bowraville . I sped through both of them.

Beautiful, especially the last paragraph: “When you leave the room, do not yell at the medical student who has a question. When you get home, do not yell at your husband. If he left his socks on the floor again today, it is all right.” (Via Cup of Jo).

The crappy dinner party. It’s been making the rounds, but I like it.

◌ 20 of Bruce Springsteen’s favourite books. His new autobiography is definitely on my list!

◌ Food for thought: “the tyranny of makeup”

The first bread that H. made, post-PhD! <3
The first loaf that H. made, post-PhD!❤